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Anni and Josef Albers at Black Mountain College, 1938. Photograph by Theodore Dreier

Due to Covid-19 many museums are closed; please check the websites of these institutions for information on closings and resources.

Anni Albers
Double Impression I, 1978
photo offset
sheet: 11 x 9 in. (27.9 x 22.9 cm)
1994.11.54

2020 Asheville, North Carolina

Question Everything! The Women of Black Mountain College celebrates the work and impact of the women associated with Black Mountain College, featuring a wide-ranging group of artists including Anni Albers, Suzi Gablik, Ruth Asawa, Jo Sandman, M.C. Richards, and Hazel Larsen Archer. BMC was a place where women could explore their identities as artists and individuals; a space where women were expected to question things, to think critically and to explore their own self determinacy. Through artworks, personal accounts and archival film and photographs, Question Everything! details how this new generation went forward with a strong sense of what it meant to be a woman in the twentieth century, forging new paths for themselves and those who followed in their footsteps.

Installation view, Out of Place: A Feminist Look at the Collection, Brooklyn Museum (2020). Photo: Jonathan Dorado

2020 Brooklyn, New York

Out of Place: A Feminist Look at the Collection presents artworks that defy conventional museum display and collecting frameworks. By featuring works that have routinely been seen as "out of place" in major museums—because of the artist's identity or their unorthodox approach to materials and subjects—the exhibition examines how artists can transform long-held cultural assumptions.

Out of Place showcases forty-four artists whose practices require a broader and more dynamic view of modern and contemporary art, including Anni Albers, Louise Bourgeois, Beverly Buchanan, Chryssa, Thornton Dial, Helen Frankenthaler, Lourdes Grobet, Betye Saar, Judith Scott, Carolee Schneemann, Joan Snyder, and Emmi Whitehorse. Over half the works are on view for the first time, including key collection objects and new acquisitions, such as highlights from the recent Souls Grown Deep Foundation Gift of art by Black artists of the American South, and a selection of American quilts.

Josef Albers
Never Before d, 1976
screenprint
sheet: 19 x 20 in. (48.3 x 50.8 cm)
1976.4.231.4
Josef Albers
Never Before i, 1976
screenprint
sheet: 19 x 20 in. (48.3 x 50.8 cm)
1976.4.231.9

2020 Jacksonville, Florida

Breaking Boundaries: The Vision of Jacqueline B. Holmes celebrates the legacy of the visionary art collector, consultant, and gallerist. Regarded as one of the first nationally recognized business women in the arts, Jacqueline B. Holmes occupies a special place in the history of the arts in Jacksonville, Florida. Holmes co-founded Jacksonville's first contemporary art gallery in 1962, and later co-founded what is known today as the Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville, among many other initiatives. The exhibition highlights Holmes's personal collection of works spanning fashion, furniture, and fine art, honoring her contributions as a pioneering woman in the arts, and her dedication to the community in Jacksonville.

Anni Albers
DO V, 1973
screenprint
sheet: 25 5/8 x 25 5/8 in. (65.1 x 65.1 cm)
1994.11.30

2020 Berlin

31: Women references two groundbreaking presentations held at Peggy Guggenheim's New York gallery Art of This Century, the Exhibition by 31 Women, 1943, and The Women, 1945. The initiator and co-curator was Marcel Duchamp, who was Guggenheim's friend and advisor. These were the first exhibitions in the United States that focused, to this extent, exclusively on women artists. The women represented a young generation, from eleven different countries. In terms of content, representatives of Surrealism found themselves alongside abstract painters, Dada-influenced artists and previously unknown new trends.

Taking its lead from these important founding documents of feminist art history, the exhibition 31: Women, with some sixty works from the Daimler Art Collection, brings two longstanding emphases of the collection into sharper focus. The concentration on leading female figures in twentieth- and twenty-first-century art and the research and projects conducted since 2016 on Duchamp, curatorial practice, and the readymade. 31: Women begins, in historical terms, with works from the Bauhaus and concrete art traditions, moves on to European and American movements such as Zero and Minimalism, and then broadens the horizon with younger artists from India, South Africa, Nigeria, Chile, Israel, the United States, and other countries. The exhibition brings together early feminist trends and global perspectives of contemporary art in surprising constellations and thematic stagings.

Anni Albers
Black-White-Gold I, 1950
cotton, lurex, and jute
25 x 19 in. (68.3 x 48.3 cm)
1996.12.1

2020 New Britain, Connecticut

In Thread and On Paper explores the groundbreaking work and writing that Anni Albers produced in Connecticut from the 1950s through the end of her life in 1994. The exhibition includes an extensive body of textiles, wall hangings, commercial collaborations, and works on paper.

Josef Albers teaching at Yale, 1955–56
Photograph by John Cohen

2020 Vancouver

Uncommon Language delves into various modes of language used in modern and contemporary art. Touching on questions of abstraction, spirituality, subjectivity and embodiment, Uncommon Language features a wide range of artworks by local, Canadian and international artists from the Vancouver Art Gallery's collection. Artists include Josef Albers, Sonny Assu, Allyson Clay, Beau Dick, General Idea, Jenny Holzer, Robert Indiana, Ellsworth Kelly, Ann Kipling, Lui Shou Kwan, Attila Richard Lukacs, Ken Lum, Agnes Martin, Ad Reinhardt, Mia Westerlund Roosen, Françoise Sullivan, Cy Twombly, Rachel Whiteread, and Zhu Jinshi, among others.