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Josef Albers
Palatial, 1965
from the portfolio Soft Edge–Hard Edge
screenprint
sheet: 17 x 17 in. (43.2 x 43.2 cm)

2018 New York

Saturated explores the elusive, complex phenomenon of color perception and how it has captivated artists, designers, scientists, and sages. Featuring over 190 objects spanning antiquity to the present from the collections of Smithsonian Libraries and Cooper Hewitt, the exhibition reveals how designers apply the theories of the world's greatest color thinkers to bring order and excitement to the visual world.

Anni Albers
Design for a 1926 unexecuted wallhanging, n.d.
gouache with pencil on photo offset paper
15 x 9 3/4 in. (38.1 x 24.7 cm)
1994.10.1
Anni Albers
With Verticals, 1946
cotton and linen
61 × 46.5 in. (154.9 × 118.1 cm)
2004.12.1
Anni Albers
Red and Blue Layers, 1954
cotton
24 1/4 × 14 3/4 in. (61.6 × 37.8 cm)
1998.12.1
Anni Albers
Knot, 1947
gouache on paper
17 × 20 in. (43.2 × 51 cm)
1994.10.3

2018 Düsseldorf + London

Anni Albers is a full-scale retrospective bringing together the most important examples of her work, from beautiful small-scale creations to wall hangings. The exhibition further explores the textiles Albers designed for mass-production and her use of new technologies and synthetic fibers. As a student at the radical and ostensibly egalitarian Bauhaus art school, Anni Albers, like other women, was barred from becoming a painter. Instead she enrolled in the weaving workshop and made textiles her means of expression. Albers rose to become an influential figure, exploring the technical limits of hand-weaving to pioneer innovative uses of woven fabric as art, architecture, and design.

Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio I / Folder 8, 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 20 in. (38.1 x 50.8 cm)
1976.4.245.8
Josef Albers
Formulation: Articulation, Folio II / Folder 31, 1972
screenprint
sheet: 15 x 40 in. (38.1 x 101.6 cm)
1972.4.245.64
Josef Albers
Park, ca. 1923
glass, metal, wire, and paint
19 1/2 × 15 in. (49.5 × 38.1 cm)
1992.6.28
Anni Albers
Study for DO II, 1973
gouache on blueprint paper
18 1/4 × 18 1/2 in. (46.3 × 47 cm)
1994.10.44

2015 Weil am Rhein + Bonn + Lausanne

Das Bauhaus #allesistdesign is a major exhibition presenting a comprehensive overview of the Bauhaus concept of design. The Bauhaus was one of the most influential cultural institutions of the twentieth century, a place where the leading tendencies of the European avant-garde converged and melded. Stylized into a myth, the Bauhaus also came to epitomize the modern design cliché: geometric, industrial, cool. Das Bauhaus #allesistdesign presents a multiplicity of rare, in some cases never-before-seen works from the fields of design, architecture, art, film, and photography, and documents underlying developmental processes and societal models. At the same time, the exhibition considers the influence of the Bauhaus as it relates to current developments in design, such as the digital revolution, and features works by contemporary designers and artists. Viewed from this present-day perspective, the Bauhaus reveals an array of new facets with surprising contemporary relevance. Featured designers and artists include Josef and Anni Albers, Marianne Brandt, Marcel Breuer, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Lyonel Feininger, Joseph Grima, Walter Gropius, Enzo Mari, Olaf Nicolai, Open Desk, Adrian Sauer, Oskar Schlemmer, among many others.

Josef Albers
Study for Mantic I, ca. 1940
oil on blotting paper
12 5/8 x 13 3/4 in. (32.1 x 34.9 cm)
1976.2.231

2018 Asheville, North Carolina

Between Form and Content: Perspectives on Jacob Lawrence and Black Mountain College is the first exhibition to focus on Lawrence's experiences during the summer of 1946, when Josef Albers invited Lawrence to teach painting at Black Mountain College. One of the most widely regarded American artists of the 20th century, Jacob Lawrence (1917–2000) is known for his paintings, drawings, and prints that hover between abstraction and socially inspired narrative realism, chronicling African-American history and experience during his lifetime. In addition to Lawrence's paintings, the exhibition features works by Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence, Josef and Anni Albers, Leo Amino, Jean Varda, Ruth Asawa, Ray Johnson, and Beaumont and Nancy Newhall. The exhibition also examines Lawrence's paintings, pedagogy, and legacy in a contemporary context, through the lens of four multimedia artists: Animator/filmmaker Martha Colburn; composer/performer Tyondai Braxton; installation artist Grace Villamil; and writer and interdisciplinary artist Jace Clayton (DJ Rupture).

Josef Albers
Variant VI, 1966
from the portfolio Ten Variants
screenprint
sheet: 17 x 17 in. (43.2 x 43.2 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art
Josef Albers
Homage to the Square I, 1967
from the portfolio Homage to the Square
screenprint
sheet: 24 3/16 × 24 3/16 in. (61.4 × 61.4 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art

2018 New York

Programmed: Rules, Codes, and Choreographies in Art, 1965–2018 establishes connections between works of art based on instructions, spanning over fifty years of conceptual, video, and computational art. The pieces in the exhibition are all "programmed" using instructions, sets of rules, and code, but they also address the use of programming in their creation. The exhibition links two strands of artistic exploration: the first examines the program as instructions, rules, and algorithms with a focus on conceptual art practices and their emphasis on ideas as the driving force behind the art; the second strand engages with the use of instructions and algorithms to manipulate the TV program, its apparatus, and signals or image sequences. Featuring works drawn from the Whitney's collection, Programmed looks back at predecessors of computational art and shows how the ideas addressed in those earlier works have evolved in contemporary artistic practices. At a time when our world is increasingly driven by automated systems, Programmed traces how rules and instructions in art have both responded to and been shaped by technologies, resulting in profound changes to our image culture.

Anni Albers
TR III, 1970
screenprint
sheet: 16 1/2 x 18 1/2 in. (42 x 47 cm)
1994.11.21
Anni Albers
GR I, 1970
screenprint
sheet: 29 x 24 in. (73.6 x 60.9 cm)
1994.11.18
Josef Albers
Variant IX, 1967
screenprint
sheet: 17 x 17 in. (43.2 x 43.2 cm)
1976.4.173.9

2018 Old Lyme, Connecticut

Paper Trail: American Prints, Drawings, and Watercolors draws from the museum's collection and features significant works by Connecticut artists from colonial times to the present. Works on paper have been cherished in Old Lyme since the art colony's heyday, when artists gathered around Florence Griswold's parlor table to play the "Wiggle Game"—an amusement where one artist was challenged to finish a drawing of disparate lines begun by another. The museum's collection has grown in scope to include works on paper by Josef and Anni Albers, Fidelia Bridges, Thomas Nason, and Sol LeWitt, among many others.

Josef Albers
Tlaloc, 1944
woodcut in rough pine board
15 x 14 1/2 in. (38.1 x 36.8 cm)
1976.4.118
Josef Albers
Tenayuca, 1942
oil on masonite
8 1/2 x 12 in. (21.6 x 30.5 cm)
1976.1.1099

2018 Sao Paulo + Berlin + Bern

Bauhaus Imaginista is an international project commemorating the centenary of the foundation of the German design school. Bauhaus Imaginista comprises international exhibitions and debates, designed and developed by the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and Media (BKM) of Germany, Bauhaus Association, and Goethe Institut, in partnership with several institutions. At Sesc Pompeia, the exhibition presents archival documents, publications, objects, and works of art related to Bauhaus teachers, students, and artists. In addition, the exhibition features artists from outside Germany who were directly influenced by the Bauhaus.

Josef Albers
Variant of Related, n.d.
oil on masonite
16 x 13 in. (40.6 x 33 cm)
1976.1.1052
Anni Albers
Study for DO II, 1973
gouache on blueprint paper
18 1/4 × 18 1/2 in. (46.3 × 47 cm)
1994.10.44

2018 Münster

Bauhaus and America: Experiments in Light and Motion is being presented on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus. Based on the importance of the Bauhaus—and in particular the Bauhaus stage as an interdisciplinary laboratory for experiments in light and movement—the artistic debates of former Bauhaus members and Americans are examined for the first time with light and movement, including light and kinetic art, experimental film, dance, and performance. The exhibition also features works by European artists from the 1950s to the present day.

2018 Columbia, South Carolina

2018 Saint Louis, Missouri

2018 Kansas City, Missouri

2018 Vienna, Austria

Painting with Method: Neoavantgarde Positions from the Mumok Collection explores paintings from the 1960s and 1970s, an era characterized by its radical breaks with tradition, by redefinitions of creative approaches and artistic media. The emergence of media-based art and the link between the theory and practice of art, in turn, led to innovative forms of painting. The general tendency to abandon figurative, or gestural-abstract painting went hand in hand with the emergence of focused, formal and configured work structures referencing the general conditions of image and painting, as well as links to new art forms and media. Featured artists include Josef Albers, Alan Charlton, Helen Frankenthaler, Roland Goeschl, Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Kriesche, Morris Louis, Karel Malich, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, Hermann Painitz, Larry Poons, Ad Reinhardt, Gerhard Richter, and Zdeněk Sýkora, among others.